Can Indian engineering regain its former shine?

India has produced some of the world’s greatest engineers and scientists and graduates hundreds of thousands of engineers annually. Mughal Indian civil engineering led the world 500 years ago. Therefore, today’s relatively slow progress towards a modern, sustainable, industrialized society is puzzling. India’s national productivity, along with many other low-income countries, lags advanced economies like USA, Japan, and Europe by a factor of about 5, a gap that has hardly changed in many decades.

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Engineering graduates will need help very soon

The most critical issue for engineering right now is a collapse in short and medium term employment opportunities for engineering graduates.

It’s not just the Corona Virus. Mobility restrictions and the oil price collapse are stopping engineering projects around the world.

Project cancellations and a loss of investor confidence will force engineering firms and suppliers to curtail hiring and many will close or stand down existing employees.

What can we, as a global community of engineers, do to help the next few cohorts of engineering graduates, many of whom will find it nearly impossible to find paid engineering work? If we don’t find ways to support these people, we risk losing a generation of engineers and stifling an economic recovery with critical engineering skill shortages.

I would like to hear about your suggestions – please respond to this post with ideas.

Here is my suggestion.

We all know that engineering graduates have so much to learn that is not taught in university engineering schools. Much of that has to be learned in the workplace. However, there is also much that graduates can learn while they’re looking for work.

My forthcoming book “Learning Engineering Practice” provides a detailed learning program for engineers looking for work:

  1. Perception skills – listening, reading documents, reading people and seeing;
  2. Researching engineering component and service suppliers;
  3. Researching the business environment, understanding where finance is being directed at engineering projects; and
  4. Building proficiency in applying relevant engineering standards.

The last one, applying engineering standards, is where experienced engineers could make a big contribution. In any given engineering discipline, these days, there are 50 – 100 relevant standards used in everyday practice. It takes time for an engineering graduate to learn which standards are out there, and how to apply them with discretion.

There will be lots of us with excess time on our hands. There are excellent online teaching tools these days. As a community, we could develop online learning resources for graduate engineers who will be either unemployed for many months, or forced into casual employment such as driving delivery vehicles, warehouse packing or fruit picking.

University engineering courses provide only a superficial introduction to one or two standards at best. Recently I have been helping to compile indicators of practice for mechatronic engineers, working with the National Mechatronics Committee in the Mechanical College of Engineers Australia. We identified around 75 relevant standards. While not all mechatronic engineers need to be proficient in applying all of them, there is plenty of scope for learning. After all, standards represent the accumulated experience of engineers who have learned practical lessons, often the hard way.

I believe that a concerted effort by volunteers, with appropriate organisation, could result in helpful learning resources and even one-on-one online coaching capacity. This might help a large number of graduate engineers to build their knowledge of industry standards, giving them credentials to help them and their future employers when the economy starts to recover.

Here’s an opportunity for us to invest in our collective future, as a profession. I am happy to contribute more details if you and others think this is a worthwhile idea to pursue.

If you have extensive experience working with some engineering standards and you have time to help out, let me know. I would be happy to give you some pointers and suggestions.

Use my UWA email address: james.trevelyan@uwa.edu.au

Engineering the Sustainable Development Goals

Click here for the article: Engineering the Sustainable Development Goals

It actually appears at SDGO, a respository of published knowledge on implementing the UN Sustainable Development Goals by Taylor & Francis, publishers of my book The Making of an Expert Engineer. I was very honoured to be invited to help edit this collection… and in that role, contribute this opinion piece. In this piece I argue that engineering is the key to achieving all the goals. Particularly in low-income countries.

Since I started taking an interest in the SDGs, it concerned me that there’s so little on the critical role of engineers. It’s not just the obvious goals… water, sanitation, energy, cities… picked out by the World Federation of Engineering Organizations. In fact, even WFEO have struggled to gain recognition in the UN system. Currently engineering lies pidgeon-holed under the assistant director general of the UNESCO natural sciences division. If you browse the UN SDG web site above, you will find it hard to find any mention of engineering. In 2010 UNESCO commissioned a report on engineering. It shows just how far we have to move. I performed a content analysis of the text and the words “value” and “benefit” are linked overwhelmingly to attending conferences! I guess that fits with the UNESCO culture.

So does it really matter that engineering is not recognised as a real solution for implementing the SDGs?

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Can Indian engineering regain its former shine?

India has produced some of the world’s greatest engineers and scientists and graduates hundreds of thousands of engineers annually. Mughal Indian civil engineering led the world 500 years ago. Therefore, today’s relatively slow progress towards a modern, sustainable, industrialized society is puzzling. India’s national productivity, along with many other low-income countries, lags advanced economies like USA, Japan, and Europe by a factor of about 5, a gap that has hardly changed in many decades.

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How important is STEM education?

Recent reports have highlighted Australia’s declining results in PISA testing of maths, science and reading capabilities of children. Some in particular have drawn attention to Australia’s relatively weak performance compared with China and Singapore. I am unsure what this means. Should we invest more in maths and science education?

The Singaporean government is making it harder for foreigners to work there. International company people I meet in Singapore complain that young Singaporeans cannot perform as well as foreigners and demand too much pay, and the government is trying to force companies to employ more locals.

Read more: I argue that STEM is not the most important priority

Webinar: Engineering and the UN Sustainable Development Goals

The productivity difference or relative wealth gap between rich and poor countries has hardly shifted in decades. I will explain why neglecting engineering as a critical input has undermined efforts to close this gap.

Engineering educators have inadvertently contributed to this failure.

New research results point to solutions that could empower engineers to deliver long anticipated social and economic development in countries like India, Indonesia, Nigeria and China.

I will explain why implementing the global UN Sustainable Development goals like halting CO2 emissions requires these transformations in engineering and engineering education.

Wednesday, September 25 at 8 pm West Australian time; 5:30 pm India Standard Time; 12 pm GMT; 8 am US EDT.

Here is the recording: http://www.ifees.net/engineering-unsdgs/

(Photo credit: Bill Wegener at unsplash.com)

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30-Second Engineering: the book is in print at last

A new way to understand engineers and engineering.

A big thank you to all the contributors: without their efforts as well, it would not have been possible.

Andrew McVeigh, Colin Brown, Donglu Shi, Doug Cooper, George Catalano, Gong Ke, Hung Nguyen, James Trevelyan, Jan Hayes, Jenn Stroud Rossman, John Blake, John Krupczak, Jonathon Scott, Jorge Spitalnik, Julia Lamborn, Kate Disney, Marlene Kanga, Matt Smith, Neill Stansbury, Paul Newman, Paul Shearing, Raj Kurup, Roger Hadgraft, Roma Agrawal, Sally Male, Sean Moran, Tim Sercombe, Tomás A. Sancho, Veena Sahajwalla.

Also thanks to Katie Crous, the copy editor, Elizabeth Clinton, and Kate Shanahan and their colleagues at Quarto Press.

The book goes on sale in four languages in October: English, Spanish, French and German.  Hopefully more will follow.

Australian Election Surprise

Some of you may be disappointed with the Australian federal election result last Saturday. Especially if you think like I do, that we need to take stronger action to reduce greenhouse emissions and also to prepare people for much warmer weather to come.

Actually, there’s not much politicians can really do. Think about it. Pretty much everything we need to do to reduce greenhouse emissions relies on engineering and that in turn relies on private finance.

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Engineering Value Creation

Before reading this, please see the post of December 7, 2017, where I have released a comprehensive guide for engineers, students and educators on value creation in engineering enterprises…..

In my last post, I wrote a brief explanation about value and value creation, noting that “value” has many different meanings.

In this post I will summarize what Bill Williams and I think is a new theory of engineering value creation, the subject of my address to the International Conference on Engineering Education Research (iCEER 2016) in Sydney on November 24.

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